Fantastic Fall Foliage Workshops

 

Capture Autumn In New Hampshire.

Due to last years overwhelming demand I will be leading two Fall Foliage Workshops this year in the beautiful picturesque White Mountains of New Hampshire, home of some of the most spectacular scenery and “leaf peeping” to be found anywhere.

Dates.

This year the workshops will be held the weekend of September 30th – October 2nd and again the following weekend, October 7th – 9th.

What’s In Store.

During each of these 2+ day workshops we will travel the White Mountains and north country of New Hampshire in search of the best fall color and scenic views. From waterfalls bordered by the reds, yellows, and golds of a New Hampshire autumn, to scenic mountain vistas overlooking remote mountain ponds, you’re sure to come away with many colorful autumn images.

Friday evening there is a short meet and greet and if time allows we’ll get out and get some photos! But not too late as we will have two very full days of photography ahead of us on Saturday and Sunday.

Saturday morning we will start out before sunrise in order to capture the best morning light. After each mornings shoot we will return to the White Mountain Hostel were we will have an image review and post processing session, going over the mornings photos. After the image review session there will be a couple of hour mid day break to relax, recharge, and get a bite to eat. Then we will meet at the prescribed time for the afternoon/evenings shoot.

After a good nights rest, we will do it all over again on Sunday.

What’s Included.

Transportation throughout the White Mountain area for the duration of the workshop, where I will take you to some of the most popular, with good reason, White Mountain locations, as well as many off the beaten path “secret” places.

Tips, tricks, and techniques for capturing beautiful fall foliage images. Workshops are kept small with no more than 3 participants so I’m able to provide the best and most personal instruction possible.

Daily post-processing/image review session.

What’s Not.

Transportation to the North Conway, NH area.

Meals and lodging. For lodging I highly recommend the White Mountain Hostel in Conway for its clean rooms(several of them private), friendly staff, and extremely budget friendly rates. For those not interested in the “Hostel experience,” there are numerous lodging options in the North Conway area. I do recommend booking your lodging early as rooms fill up quickly, especially during the second workshop weekend which falls on the Columbus Day holiday weekend.

Your Investment.

The cost for these 2+ day workshops is $725.

For more information, cancellation policy, or to reserve your spot use the Contact Page.

Waterfall Wednesday

Crystal Cascade, Pinkham Notch, NH

Majestic Fall, Crystal Cascade, Pinkham Notch, NH

Dropping down thru a deep gorge, Crystal Cascade creates a dramatic waterfall scene in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

I’ve hiked by this waterfall many times, usually in the dark or too tired at the end of a long hike to give it much thought.

A couple of weeks ago I decided it was time to pay it a proper visit. So with workshop client in tow we made the short and easy hike to this spectacular White Mountain waterfall. One of 13 waterfalls we visited and photographed over a two day period.

I’m glad I finally took the time to stop.

 

Waterfall Wednesday

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I love waterfalls!

Give me water cascading over rock ledges and I’m in photographer’s paradise. Over the last few weeks I’ve been spending as much time as I can scouting out and photographing waterfalls. All in preparation for my upcoming White Mountains Waterfalls Photography Workshop.

Do you like waterfalls?

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If so, join me June 17th thru the 19th for 2+ days of waterfall photography adventure and instruction.

Over the course of the weekend we’ll head out bright and early each morning to capture a few of New Hampshire’s most spectacular waterfalls, followed by a mid day break for image review, some post processing tips, lunch and some much needed rest.

Then, it’s back out to do it all over again for the afternoon and into the evening.

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Be prepared to get wet and make some great photos!

I’ll be going over how I decide on composition.

Using long exposure to give en ethereal look to the flowing cascade.

Camera settings that I guarantee will make your life easier.

During the post processing sessions I’ll be going over my workflow from import to final image using Adobe Lightroom and the full suit of Nik Collection by Google creative plugins.

Your investment for 2+ days of waterfall magic in some of the most beautiful scenery imaginable is $725*

Space is very limited so I may provide the utmost in personalized attention to each attendee. Please use the Contact form for any questions or to reserve your spot today!

*Meals and lodging not included. Transportation during the workshop is included.

 

HAPPY EARTH DAY

Take care of her…

 

                       …She’s the only one we have.

 

Dance

Color In The Waves, Autumn Color Reflected On The Swift River

To the soft sweet music of the forest the water shall dance.

The Reward As Orange Fades To Blue.

Winter Light.

The view at 4,802′.

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There are 48 peaks on the official list of New Hampshire summits with an elevation of over 4,000 feet. Mount Moosilauke is #10 on that list. “The Moose,” is also the western most peak to be included on the list, and one I had yet to climb.

My reward for the effort, a snowshoe hike on a gorgeous brilliant winter afternoon under a clear blue sky, was to watch the sun as it set over windswept mountains and a moonlit hike back to the car.

As orange,

Winter Sunset, Mount Moosilauke

fades to blue.

Capturing Sunset, Photographer On Mt. Moosilauke

Big, But How Big?

Just how grand is that landscape anyway?

Franconia Ridge From Mt. FlumeAre those mountains in the distance some of New Hampshire’s tallest, or just a few small hills? Without anything in the photo to provide a reference of scale it’s really hard to say for sure.

So what’s a photographer to do?

Simple, by incorporating something of a known size, like a person or a building into your photos you’re more easily able to give viewers a sense of scale in your image.

Fly Fishing At Sunset, Stonehouse Pond.

The fly fisherman standing in his canoe helps to give an idea of just how tall the granite cliffs along the shore of Stonehouse Pond are. (Can’t see him? Click on the image to see a larger version and look for the fisherman along the far shore towards the right side of the image).  

A lone hiker rests on his way to the summit of Mount Washington

Mt. Washington is the tallest peak in the northeast. Having my friend Glen, seen here taking a break on our way to the summit last July, gives an idea of just how big the mountain is. And how much farther we have to go before we reach the summit.

Washington And The Ravines Above Joe Dodge Lodge

Here’s another shot of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington, (the peak in the center of the frame), shown with the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Joe Dodge Lodge in the lower foreground. The lodge, the cars in the parking lot, as well as the roadway all provide scale to the mountains looming over them.

People and buildings aren’t the only thing to use to give a sense of scale. Anything of a commonly known size will work.

For more interpretations of this weeks Weekly Photo Challenge, click HERE.