Water Wet


For this week the Weekly Photo Challenge theme is good old H2O. As a landscape photographer water is the prevailing theme in many of my photographs. When looking through my photos trying to decide which photos to include in this post it appears that roughly three quarters of my photos contain water in one form or another.

Here are a few wet examples, followed by a few tips for making your own watery photos.


Tips for photographing the wet stuff.

1 ~ First and foremost, use a good quality circular polarizing filter, or CPL. If you only ever buy one filter make sure the CPL is it. It’s the one filter that cannot be duplicated digitally. They’re great for reducing or eliminating unwanted glare and reflections from wet rocks, leaves, and the surface of the water, thus allowing you to see through the surface of the water to what’s on the bottom.

2 ~ Don’t be afraid of a little rain. Most camera, whether they are listed as “weather sealed” or not are quite capable of withstanding a sprinkle or two. I always carry a small pack towel in my camera bag on the days I venture out when theres wain in the forecast.

Speaking of towels, dab don’t wipe the water off of your camera. Wiping could force the water into places that won’t make the camera happy.

3 ~ If it’s raining out use a lens hood to help keep raindrops from landing on the front element of your lens. Even when using a lens hood you should check the front element often and carry a clean microfiber lens cloth to wipe away any raindrops.

4 ~ When photographing water in its frozen form be sure to acclimate your camera slowly when you bring it inside after being out in the cold. The condensation that can form on, even worse in your camera again won’t make your camera very happy. I use two methods to deal with this. One is to put your camera in a large ziplock bag. Force as much air as possible out of the bag before sealing it. This way condensation will form on the outside of the bag, not your camera. The second is to simply put your camera in your camera bag and close it up, this is the method I use most. The padding on the camera bags act as insulation allowing the camera to slowly acclimate. Of course take your memory card out before hand so you do’t have to wait to upload your masterpieces.

Note: Tip #4 also applies to taking your camera from an air conditioned space out into hot humid weather.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dreamy

Dreaming The Dream Of Autumn

Days shorten, in the air a chill.

Landscape awash in brilliance.

The waters pass on their meandering journey.

To dream the dream of autumn.

Colorful fall color reflected on the water

Click HERE for more dreams.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Juxtaposition

Does the water,

as it rushes past the ice hanging in crystalline beauty,

realize they are one and the same?


Weekly Photo Challenge: One


“But calm, white calm, was born into a swan”

                                                                                      ~Elizabeth Coatsworth

A lone mute swan sits motionless on the still surface of the water, with a wall of brown reeds as a backdrop.


Going Back Again…

…and again.

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Have you ever made a photograph that you just weren’t sure about? Not sure if it was good enough to keep, good enough to share, should it simply be deleted?

This is one of those photos.

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green plant in flowing water

Time and again I go through my archives, looking for both good photos I’ve long since forgotten, and photos that should have been deleted long ago.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, I’m brutal when it comes to my photos and whether they stay or go. My last stroll through my archives was no exception, the carnage was massive. Several hundred image files got the axe.

Yes I know, I’ve heard all the arguments, “storage is cheap,” and “who knows what image editing technology might be coming,” blah, blah, blah.

As far as I’m concerned, if I look at an image and know for a fact it will never see the light of day, never be printed, never be shared on my Facebook page, or be uploaded to me website, it has no business taking up space on my hard drive. A crap photo is a crap photo.

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But back to the above image.

For some reason I can’t bring my self to delete it, and until now I’ve never shared it. There’s just something about it that has saved it many times from being unceremoniously slapped with the delete key.

Am I missing something? Should the executioner’s axe claim another victim?

One Last Glance

Mid Stream, Mid Leap, By The Light Of The Moon

With time to kill one evening this past week, I stopped by a small stream near where I work to capture a few long exposures of fallen leaves swirling on the water’s surface.

Two of my favorites from my experiments with leaves, water, and time, can be seen HEREand HERE.

Ready to leave, as even under the light of the rising full moon it was getting too dark to see and safely navigate the stream side rocks and boulders, I started back to my car.

One fortuitous glance as I leapt from one boulder to the next nearly stopped me in my tracks.

As I glanced downstream I could see the most beautiful light reflecting on the water. The rising full moon, casting its wonderful glow on the jet black surface of the water, and on the dark, wet, leaf littered rocks, was rising in perfect alignment with the stream.

Surely I had time for one last 60 second exposure.

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Stream Under Autumn Full Moon