WPC: Surprise

A little over a week ago, on April 1st, we here in New Hampshire received one hell of an April Fools surprise. A spring snowstorm dumped over 18 inches of heavy wet snow on us.

Unable to resist an opportunity to capture a few landscape images with a blanket of fresh snow I grabbed my camera and ventured out.

For more Weekly Photo Challenge Surprises click HERE.

Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow!

Happy First Day of Winter Everyone!

Get outside and enjoy the snow and ice.

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For those of you in the southern hemisphere, have a great summer!

(Too bad you’re missing out on all the winter fun) 🙂

Vertical, Extreme, Motion.

Big Air On The Headwall, Tuckerman Ravine

In order to freeze the motion of this skier as he flys through the air, I used a fast shutter speed.

Camera settings – 100 ISO, F/5.6, 200mm @ 1/1600 sec.

Tuckerman Ravine.

On the shoulders of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington rests one of my favorite places in all of the Granite State. For the past five years I’ve made a pilgrimage into Tuckerman Ravine to photograph the immense head wall of the ravine bathed in the pink-orange of alpenglow.

Looking out over frozen, snow covered Hermit Lake, the headwall and surrounding mountains of Tuckerman Ravine glow in the pink alpenglow as the first rays of the sun hit the snow covered slopes. In the foreground is the weathered cedar fence on the shore of the small lake.

 

This year I wanted to capture something a little different.

Tucks is a must visit destination for extreme skiers from throughout New England. People will drive great distances to ski the infamous runs, The Ice Fall, Hillmans Highway, and Lobster Claw to name but a few. All of the routes are steep, with some sections as steep as 55°, skiing the head wall of Tuckerman is not for the faint of heart or the novice.

This is no lift serviced ski resort either, for that there is Wildcat just up the road from the trail head. To ski Tuckerman Ravine requires dedication and a lot of effort. All skiers must carry their gear up the Tuckerman Ravine trail, with the first stop the Hermit Lake shelter, and then another .7 miles into the base of the bowl, for a total of about 3 miles.

Spring Crowds, Tuckerman Ravine

Once in the bowl is when the real work begins.

Skiers must then climb up the very steep walls of the ravine, often climbing the very run they will ski down, in order to earn their turns.

Climbing For Their Turns

 

 

 

As for the skier in the first photo? Six skiers flung themselves off The Ice Fall while I was there enjoying the sun and the action. Two stuck the landing, skiing down to the roar of the crowd.

The rest, well for them it went something more like this…

skier_face_plant_1414-Edit

 

For all the face plants, yard sales, and ass over tea kettle cartwheeling action, all those with less than perfect landings skied away with nothing but bruised egos and the adoration and cheers of the crowd below.

Photography 101: Double

Mirror, Mirror.

New Hampshire’s Mt. Chocorua, uniquely doubled in a mirror image created of snow and ice.

Chocorua Reflected In Ice And Snow

Weekly Photo Challenge: Layers

Layers as far as the eye can see.

 

Blue Mountain Layers

Mist In The Valley

 

Layers in pink.

 

Petals In Pink

 

 

The layers of  fore, mid, and background, within a photograph.

 

Moonrise Over Mount Washington

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: The Hue Of You

Hues That Move me.

Golden autumn leaves caught in a confusion of currents

Autumn Chaos

Pure white of freshly fallen snow

Vickery Farm In Winter

Vibrant green of an intricately patterned leaf

Symmetry

Layers of blue and pink prior to sunrise

Blue Mountain Layers

See more entries for this weeks challenge HERE