You Have To Be There!

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Why Do My Landscape Photos Still Suck?

You’ve bought a new camera, spent a boat-load of money on it too. You’ve studied every last thing you can find on how to use it. You can change camera settings like ISO, shutter speed, and aperture pretty much blindfolded. You’re a master of your new toy.

However your photos are still missing something. Ok, lets be honest, they’re boring.

Be There And Make Them Better.

Here’s my super secret tip that is guaranteed to take your photos from Ho-Hum to Oh My!

Over the dunes and to the sea. Parker River NWR.

 

It’s so simple you’ll wonder why you never thought of it.

Are you ready for it?

Sunrise Over Glacial Striations, Fort Foster, Kittery, Maine

 

You Need To Be There When Mother Nature Is Showing Off!

It really is that simple.

 

You know your camera inside and out, you have at least a basic idea of how to compose a decent photo, so what else is missing?

The right light. Dramatic weather. Both at the same time! These are the things that can add greatly to the quality and impact of your photos.

This means being on the seacoast for sunrise at least 30-45 minutes prior to actual sunrise. So sleep becomes a casualty in your pursuit of great photos. No more showing up at 9 a.m. to that scene you’ve seen in so many photos and wondering why your photos don’t even come close.

It means long early morning hikes in the dark so you can be on that mountain top for sunrise or equally long and dark hikes down after sunset. Better get a good headlamp. Make that two, just in case.

It also means freezing your butt off and often coming away with nothing because the forecast was way wrong. It means getting rained on because you gambled, and lost, on the sun coming up before the approaching storm clouds reached the horizon to block it out. You will get blown by high winds. You will suffer.

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And when you make that amazing dramatic photograph, you’ll forget all of that. You’ll only remember the light, the drama, the magic.

Morning Gold, Hampton Beach, NH

Somewhere right at this moment Mother Nature is putting on a show, are you missing it?

 

Fantastic Fall Foliage Workshops

 

Capture Autumn In New Hampshire.

Due to last years overwhelming demand I will be leading two Fall Foliage Workshops this year in the beautiful picturesque White Mountains of New Hampshire, home of some of the most spectacular scenery and “leaf peeping” to be found anywhere.

Dates.

This year the workshops will be held the weekend of September 30th – October 2nd and again the following weekend, October 7th – 9th.

What’s In Store.

During each of these 2+ day workshops we will travel the White Mountains and north country of New Hampshire in search of the best fall color and scenic views. From waterfalls bordered by the reds, yellows, and golds of a New Hampshire autumn, to scenic mountain vistas overlooking remote mountain ponds, you’re sure to come away with many colorful autumn images.

Friday evening there is a short meet and greet and if time allows we’ll get out and get some photos! But not too late as we will have two very full days of photography ahead of us on Saturday and Sunday.

Saturday morning we will start out before sunrise in order to capture the best morning light. After each mornings shoot we will return to the White Mountain Hostel were we will have an image review and post processing session, going over the mornings photos. After the image review session there will be a couple of hour mid day break to relax, recharge, and get a bite to eat. Then we will meet at the prescribed time for the afternoon/evenings shoot.

After a good nights rest, we will do it all over again on Sunday.

What’s Included.

Transportation throughout the White Mountain area for the duration of the workshop, where I will take you to some of the most popular, with good reason, White Mountain locations, as well as many off the beaten path “secret” places.

Tips, tricks, and techniques for capturing beautiful fall foliage images. Workshops are kept small with no more than 3 participants so I’m able to provide the best and most personal instruction possible.

Daily post-processing/image review session.

What’s Not.

Transportation to the North Conway, NH area.

Meals and lodging. For lodging I highly recommend the White Mountain Hostel in Conway for its clean rooms(several of them private), friendly staff, and extremely budget friendly rates. For those not interested in the “Hostel experience,” there are numerous lodging options in the North Conway area. I do recommend booking your lodging early as rooms fill up quickly, especially during the second workshop weekend which falls on the Columbus Day holiday weekend.

Your Investment.

The cost for these 2+ day workshops is $725.

For more information, cancellation policy, or to reserve your spot use the Contact Page.

Wrong Place, Right Time.

Summer Shower

 

I’m sure you’ve all heard the expression about “Being in the right place at the right time.”

Recently I had an instance of being in what turned out to be the wrong place at what turned out to be the very right time.

While out on a commercial shoot for a high end landscape design company I had been given directions to a lake house on Lake Winnipesaukee here in New Hampshire. As it turns out the directions were extremely vague, the house wasn’t numbered, it was located on a small unpaved camp road, and the road I was supposed to be on was chained off at one end. Based on the description I was given, “XX number house, on such and such road. New construction, boat house, guest house,” and with a bit of searching, eventually I was pretty sure I found the place.

To make a long story short, I was partially right, the new house and boat house were part of the property. The “guest house” was not(even though the color scheme/style matched the boat house almost exactly).

As Luck would have it the view from the beach and dock at the wrong house was quite spectacular!

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*Note: I do not advocate trespassing in order to get a photograph. Regardless of how spectacular the show going on over the lake was at the time, had I known I was on the wrong property at the time I would have left to look for a view from the correct property.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Details

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To capture the details it pays to get close.

Among the many water lilies covering the waters surface I knew this was the one. Since It was raining the morning I took this I knew I wanted to get close in order to capture not only the detail in the flower, but to accentuate the raindrops on each petal.

For this shot I had to wade out into the water almost waist deep, not an uncommon occurance, and set up my camera and tripod directly over and looking down on the flower.

Then came what may be the most difficult part of photographing water lilies up close and personal like this. And that is standing still, very still. Because even the slightest movement on my part would cause ripples on the waters surface which would then impart movement in the flower.

For this shot I use my Canon 5D MkIII with the Canon 70-200 F/2.8L IS II with a 25mm extension tube between the camera and lens, which allowed me to achieve a much closer focus than I otherwise would using just the camera and lens.

Camera Settings: F/16, 175mm, ISO 400 for 1/50 sec.

Click here to see more Weekly Photo Challenge: Details

Waterfall Wednesday

Crystal Cascade, Pinkham Notch, NH

Majestic Fall, Crystal Cascade, Pinkham Notch, NH

Dropping down thru a deep gorge, Crystal Cascade creates a dramatic waterfall scene in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

I’ve hiked by this waterfall many times, usually in the dark or too tired at the end of a long hike to give it much thought.

A couple of weeks ago I decided it was time to pay it a proper visit. So with workshop client in tow we made the short and easy hike to this spectacular White Mountain waterfall. One of 13 waterfalls we visited and photographed over a two day period.

I’m glad I finally took the time to stop.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Numbers

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Lets start with 10,000

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Thats the amount of horsepower put out by the engine in a top fuel car. During the course of each 1,000 foot,  run a top fuel car consumes roughly 22 gallons of nitro-methane fuel.

Each run is less than 4 seconds long.

300+

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A top fuel car can go from zero to ever 330 MPH in as little as 3.7 seconds. Due to weather conditions, which can greatly affect the performance of these cars, those speed weren’t quite reached the day I was at the track. But they came close.

Two.

Top fuel cars come in two flavors.

Funny Cars,

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and Dragsters.

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Both cars use the same monstrous engines, but the dragsters are slightly quicker due to aerodynamics and engine placement. The dragsters, having the engine behind the driver places more weight on the rear wheel providing better traction for the launch.

 One.

While there are a large number of people on a top fuel cars pit crew, it’s up to the driver to win the race.

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This is Brittany Force, she is one of those drivers.

Not who many of you would expect to see behind the wheel of one of these enormously powerful cars. You might be surprised just how many women drivers there are.

This is Brittany’s car.

(also seen leaving the starting line in the first photo)

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Waterfall Wednesday

Time With Garwin Falls

It Depends. 

One of the questions I’m most often asked when it comes to photographing waterfalls is what camera settings I use, particularly what shutter speed.

And my answer is always the same, “It depends.”

It depends ~ On the look I’m going for. If I’m trying to capture the shapes and swirls created by bubble caught in an eddy, I know I’ll need a longer exposure time. The image above required 8 seconds to achieve the look I was after.

It depends ~ On how fast the water is flowing. The stronger the flow the shorter the shutter speed required to capture the silky smooth look on the water.

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A few weeks ago Mossy Glen was flowing very quickly due to recent spring rains, therefor I only needed a half second exposure time when making the above photo.

It depends ~  On the amount of ambient light you’re working with. This next photo, of Middle Ammonoosuc Falls in New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, was made well after the sun had gone down. It was getting quite dark in the deep gorge the falls flows through so I knew I was going to need a very long exposure. The exposure time on this photo is 180 seconds.

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So as you can see there is no one set rule I follow when deciding on what shutter speed. Generally speaking I do try for at least half a second, but if the light is right or I really want to capture bubbles or leaves swirling on the currents I’ll experiment until I’ve captured the look I want.