Mistakes Were Made.

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What do you do when you’re making a really long exposure that ends up being grossly overexposed?

You make it black and white of course.

Last night I was photographing on the Maine coast and experimenting with long exposures. The mistake I made was to trust the histogram displayed on the LCD of my Fujifilm X-T2 when dialing in the exposure time while using my 10-stop ND filter. With the shutter set for a 15 minute exposure the histogram indicated that the photo would be underexposed, however the final image showed just the opposite, with the sky grossly overexposed. As a last resort before deleting the shot I decided to convert it to monochrome.

Luckily it worked.

Next time I’m using ND filters and long exposures I’m going to stick with the Lee Filters exposure calculator app to set the exposure time. In the past this app has been pretty spot on.

 

Waterfalls at Mid-Day?

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Ideal Waterfall Light.

If you’d ask me to describe my ideal weather and lighting conditions for photographing waterfalls I would tell you that I hope for an overcast day and with any luck a slight drizzle. I would also tell you that it is definitely not during the middle of the day under harsh sunlight.

If I can’t have the even light of an overcast day, or at the very least the waterfall is in full shade, I wouldn’t even try to photograph flowing water.

And yet I was working under the harsh light of the mid-day sun when I made the above photograph of Jackson Falls in Jackson, NH.

Even Is Even.

Last weekend I was out with a workshop client and during a break we stopped to check out this beautiful road side waterfall. I was certainly not thinking it was going to be at all photographable since it was 2 in the afternoon. As we admired the flow I started to notice something about the light. It occurred to me that the waterfall was indeed illuminated by even light. It wasn’t the beautifully soft light of an overcast day, but it was even light nonetheless. So to satisfy my own curiosity I set up my Fujifilm X-T2 with XF16mm f/1.4 lens. Knowing I was going to need help getting a long enough exposure time to blur the water I attached my Formatt-Hitech Firecrest filter holder to the lens and inserted a 10-stop neutral density filter. As I was setting up my composition I set the aperture to f/16 and the ISO to 200. Much to my surprise with the 10-stop ND filter I found I was indeed able to get a long enough exposure, to the tune of 26 second! After I took my first shot I knew I was on to something.

Lesson learned.

I’d still prefer to photograph waterfalls when its overcast and rainy out, but at least now I don’t automatically put the camera away when it’s not.

 

WPC: Reflecting

Refelcting Sunrise

Sunrise Reflection. Hampton Beach, NH

Fujifilm X-T2, XF10-24, 10mm, f/11, ISO 200, 0.4 seconds.

Additionally I used a Haida 3-stop neutral density filter to slow the shutter speed a bit in combination with a Singh Ray 2-stop reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the sky with the darker foreground. To keep the filters in place I used a Formatt-Hitech Firecrest 100 filter holder.

Of course the camera was securely mounted on a tripod.

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Go HERE for more interpretations of Reflecting.