Isolating Elements

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Sumac Shadows On Old Barn. Ossipee, NH

Normally when out photographing I focus on expansive landscapes, grand scenic views of the dramatic views in the mountains and along the coast of New Hampshire.

On my last outing to the north country I chose to make images with a more limited view. Instead of wide open spaces, the majority of what I captured were elements within the wider scene. What caught my eye were the small details, the textures, the way light and shadow played across an abandoned barn or the rusted machinery.

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Cable Grooves Worn Into An Old Pulley. Redstone Granite Quarry, Conway, NH

 

Surprisingly, I didn’t set out with the mindset that “I’m only going to photograph details, closeups, and black and white images today.”

But that’s exactly what happened. In fact for the most part, wherever I went my eye was drawn to the little details, no matter how nice the overall scene looked it was the little things that caught my eye.

Part of the explanation is my recent feeling that I’ve been missing something, creatively speaking, in my photography. Focusing solely on landscape photography with an eye towards the grand, has been richly rewarding both creatively and financially, lately however that hasn’t been enough. The feeling that I’ve been missing something may have been what triggered my eye for the intimate on this particular day.

I know it is the driving force behind my current interest in portrait photography.(Stay tuned for an upcoming post on that bit of shocking divergence from my past, “I’ll never photograph people,” way of thinking).

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Barn Window. Ossipee, NH

The next time you’re out photographing, remember the most compelling photographs are often found while isolating the elements of the scene within the scene. You never know what, or who might be looking back at you.

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The Face Of Abandoned Places. Abandoned barn, Ossipee, NH

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Photography Workshop with Jeff Sinon Does Not Disappoint

Here’s what a very happy client has to say about her private workshop experience with me. Thank you, Nancy!

Nancy de Flon's Photo Blog

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Want to go on a photography workshop? You’re in luck — whatever your location, your subject matter of interest, your topic of interest, it’s not difficult to find something to suit your requirements. It’s then a matter of matching up the logistics — the where and when — with what you can afford to pay.

DSC3818 sI’m enamored with the New England coast. I’m a New England wannabe. Having spent years traveling to and photographing Rhode Island, I discovered the northern Massachusetts and New Hampshire coasts a little over a year ago. New Hampshire can boast of only 18 miles of coastline, but what an amazing variety of visual experiences it offers. How can a visitor from New York make the most of it in a short time?

Enter photographer Jeff Sinon. A member of the

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prestigious New England Photography Guild, Jeff lives in the area and knows every…

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Vertical, Extreme, Motion.

Big Air On The Headwall, Tuckerman Ravine

In order to freeze the motion of this skier as he flys through the air, I used a fast shutter speed.

Camera settings – 100 ISO, F/5.6, 200mm @ 1/1600 sec.

Tuckerman Ravine.

On the shoulders of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington rests one of my favorite places in all of the Granite State. For the past five years I’ve made a pilgrimage into Tuckerman Ravine to photograph the immense head wall of the ravine bathed in the pink-orange of alpenglow.

Looking out over frozen, snow covered Hermit Lake, the headwall and surrounding mountains of Tuckerman Ravine glow in the pink alpenglow as the first rays of the sun hit the snow covered slopes. In the foreground is the weathered cedar fence on the shore of the small lake.

 

This year I wanted to capture something a little different.

Tucks is a must visit destination for extreme skiers from throughout New England. People will drive great distances to ski the infamous runs, The Ice Fall, Hillmans Highway, and Lobster Claw to name but a few. All of the routes are steep, with some sections as steep as 55°, skiing the head wall of Tuckerman is not for the faint of heart or the novice.

This is no lift serviced ski resort either, for that there is Wildcat just up the road from the trail head. To ski Tuckerman Ravine requires dedication and a lot of effort. All skiers must carry their gear up the Tuckerman Ravine trail, with the first stop the Hermit Lake shelter, and then another .7 miles into the base of the bowl, for a total of about 3 miles.

Spring Crowds, Tuckerman Ravine

Once in the bowl is when the real work begins.

Skiers must then climb up the very steep walls of the ravine, often climbing the very run they will ski down, in order to earn their turns.

Climbing For Their Turns

 

 

 

As for the skier in the first photo? Six skiers flung themselves off The Ice Fall while I was there enjoying the sun and the action. Two stuck the landing, skiing down to the roar of the crowd.

The rest, well for them it went something more like this…

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For all the face plants, yard sales, and ass over tea kettle cartwheeling action, all those with less than perfect landings skied away with nothing but bruised egos and the adoration and cheers of the crowd below.

Introductions – Jeff Sinon

I’ve recently been honored to be featured by Leanne Cole on her blog. When such an extremely talented photographer, with a following/fan base I could only dream of having finds my images worthy of sharing with her followers, it is truly an honor and quite humbling.

Thank you, Leanne

Autumn Hues

A cold wind blows, bringing a chill to the morning air.

Summer’s warmth becomes a pleasant memory as green becomes red and gold. 

The days are crisp, the air is clear, the hillsides dressed in brilliant Autumn Hues.

*    *    * 

The question posed on the Daily Post, 

“Changing colors, dropping temperatures, pumpkin spice lattes: do these mainstays of Fall fill your heart with warmth — or with dread?”

My answer.

Warmth, anticipation, excitement, and joy.

Autumn is the most beautiful season. The awakenings of Spring and the comforting warmth and long days of Summer pale in comparison to Fall as the land adorns itself in its colorful best one last time before Winter’s sleep falls across the landscape.

Happy Hour Begins At Three

 

And Michelle, the Queen of Peace will be there.

 

Michelle.