Forces Of Nature

Long exposure image of The Basin, Franconia, NH

Patience

 Nature has a design known only to her,

Slowly revealing her artistic intent with the passing of ages.

As the river flows, sculpting the landscape,

To the Forces of Nature even the granite succumbs.

*   *   *

Rocky Gorge, Autumn Fog.

And Now, By Popular Demand.

Over the last few years I’ve often been asked if I offer workshops. The answer has always been, “Some day.”

I’m pleased to announce that “Some Day” has finally arrived!

Whether you’re looking for a private one-on-one or a small group experience, I can taylor a workshop to your needs.

Seascapes, both morning and evening, along the rugged New Hampshire seacoast, I do that.

Or is photographing the historic charm of a classic New England seacoast town more to your liking? Let me be your guide as we walk around the Portsmouth, NH area in search of iconic New England architecture.

Waterfalls, waterfalls, waterfalls. The White Mountains of New Hampshire has some of the most picturesque waterfalls to be found anywhere.

From roadside to secluded, my June 19-21 White Mountain Waterfalls workshop and photo tour may be just the thing for you.

And then there’s Autumn.

Fall in New Hampshire is a sight to behold, with its vibrant color and mountain views, you’ll experience the spectacular beauty only autumn in New Hampshire can provide. From October 4th to the 6th I’ll be hosting a small group of photographers and helping them capture some of the beautiful color people come from the world over to witness.

For more information on rates or to reserve either a spot on one of my scheduled workshops or a private one-on-one experience, please visit my Workshop page.

As always, don’t hesitate to Contact me.

Making Better Waterfall Photos

Precipitous Plunge

Everyone loves to photograph waterfalls, by clicking HERE, or on the image above, to learn four of my most used tips for making better waterfall photos.

Depth, Creating The Illusion.

The Problem With Landscape Photography.Lead The Way

We see the world around us in three dimensions, unfortunately our camera does not. Trying to convey the depth and dimension our eyes see with the two dimensional medium of photography can often leave the final image looking flat, without depth.

Fortunately, by using a few simple tricks when composing your photos you can effectively create the illusion of depth in your landscape images.

Converging Lines.

Falls In The Forest.

I like to use converging lines, both subtle and obvious, to create perceived depth in my compositions. In the photo above I used a rather winding interpretation of converging lines to help create the illusion of depth.

The waterfall and granite stream bank, very wide and taking up the entire foreground, then gets progressively more narrow while leading the eye deeper into the frame, eventually converging at the point where it disappears into the forest.

Railroad tracks as they appear to come together in the distance are another more obvious example of converging lines.

Rails. Pondicherry NWR

Place The Foreground In Shadow.

Odiorne Salt MarshThe human eye is attracted to bright light. By having a prominent foreground appear darker than the brighter, more brightly lit background can provide a sense of depth in your photos.

Shoot Vertical.

Moonrise Over Lonesome LakeI’ve found that by photographing with the camera in the vertical, more commonly referred to at the “portrait” camera position, can help create depth. Include a strong foreground, leading lines, and by placing the main subject in the upper third of the photo works really well to bring out the depth in a scene.

What tricks do you use to create the illusion of depth in your photos? In the mean time, check out these other interpretations of Depth.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Serenity

Mid-Stream. Mad River, Farmington, NH

Surround yourself in nature’s silence.

Close your eyes, release your thoughts.

Let serenity wash through.

Enjoy the Serenity

Photography 101: Experiment With Composition.

Landscape or Portrait~

Experiments in Composition

When you’re out photographing, especially if your photographing a popular and often photographed location, try experimenting with composition.

I different point of view can mean the difference between just another photo like all the rest, or a truly unique image.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dreamy

Dreaming The Dream Of Autumn

Days shorten, in the air a chill.

Landscape awash in brilliance.

The waters pass on their meandering journey.

To dream the dream of autumn.

Colorful fall color reflected on the water

Click HERE for more dreams.

Why I Photograph

Falling Back-Asswards Into A Passion.

It Began In The Stars.

Holiday Lights At Nubble Light.

Some of you know how I came to find a camera in my hands, many do not.

Here’s my story.

Unlike a lot of photographers, photography was never my “Thing.” I hadn’t been shooting for decades, born with a camera in my hands, lamenting the loss of film. To me film was pretty much a dinosaur from the past. Sure I’ve heard about it, even seen it before, but as far as I was concerned it belonged right next to the dinosaurs in a museum.

Digital was well established by the time I started looking for my first camera, so that’s the way I wanted to go. I was on a budget, and not having to pay for film processing was a huge draw.

Back in ’07-’08, I had a brief, expensive but brief, interest in astronomy. I had my own big(read lots of $$) telescope, and all the fancy gear that went with it. Looking through all the astronomy magazines I started thinking, “I could get some of those awesome photos through my telescope too.” So off in search of a camera I went. I figured I should at least get a camera that I could use to take snap-shots too, as opposed to a dedicated astro-imaging camera, a little box with a sensor in it that needed to be hooked up to a computer while taking photos. Something a little more practical.

I didn’t want a point and shoot though, had to be a DSLR. And since two friends were Canon shooters, I became one too.

A lone mute swan sits motionless on the still surface of the water, with a wall of brown reeds as a backdrop.

 

Looking Down The Barrel Of A Gun.

Antique Side-by-Side On Autumn Leaves

Coincidentally, I was an avid hunter at this time as well. The passion I have for capturing images of the great outdoors now, I put into my pursuit of all things feathered back then. Ducks, geese, pheasant and grouse were my quarry of choice. And along with my dog Bailey, pursue them I did.

Dear Sweet Bailey

My dear sweet Bailey was the sweetest dog I’ve ever known, gentle beyond measure, my first daddy’s little girl.

Put her in the woods however, and she changed. Miraculously that sweet, cuddle on the couch, member of the family, was replaced by an all business, pure bird hunting machine. It was pure joy to watch at work. Those of you with any experience seeing a good bird dog work the woods know exactly what I mean, she was canine poetry in motion.

Sadly, around the same time I was in search of my first camera, Bailey was becoming too old to hunt. The desire was there, I could see it in her eyes, but what her mind wanted, her body could no longer deliver. While I continued to hunt, without her with me, my joy of time spent in the woods lessened considerably. Without my girl it just wasn’t the same. I started looking for reasons to stay home.

Yet a spark in the back of my mind had begun to glow.

Blue Mountain Layers

All those mornings spent standing in a beaver pond, or laying in a corn field, waiting for the first mallards or geese to come in, also held something else.

They held magic.

Surprisingly up to this point in my hunting life, as many times as I had thought, “this would make an amazing picture,” as I witnessed the world waking up, seeing nature come alive in ways most will never see or experience, it never clicked that maybe I should get a camera.

What can I say, I’m a slow learner.

Passion Is Born In 2008.

Long exposure image of an unnamed waterfall on the Mad River, Farmington, NH

Once I started taking my camera with me on my hunting trips, it really didn’t take long to convert my love of all things hunting into a love of hunting a different, and often more elusive prey, with a much different “weapon” of choice.

All the time spent in the woods, I was never blind to what was around me, but I didn’t really see it either. I had always felt deep in the forest was one of the most beautiful places I could be, but it took leaving my gun at home, entering the forest armed only with my camera, to really begin to see and appreciate my surroundings. It was then that perfect light became my quarry, and I was relentless in my desire to capture it.

So, I gave up hunting,  sold all of my firearms, and I’ve been focused, pun completely intended, on capturing and sharing the beauty of the natural world ever since.

Beauty most people will never see first hand.

On the plus side of giving up hunting with a gun, I don’t need to pluck a photograph. The downside though, they don’t taste very good either.

That was back in the spring of 2008.

I hadn’t set out to become a “photographer” back then, that was purely by accident. I never thought photography would become anything more than another in a long list of expensive hobbies.

I’ve never been so wrong about anything in my life.

Swiftwater Falls, Winter

 

So, that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.

And for those of you wondering, I fell so deeply in love with capturing the landscape here on Earth, I ended up selling my telescope without ever having so much as mounted my camera on it.

 

What brought you to photography, I’d love to hear your story.