Let Me Show You The Granite State.

Planning a visit to New Hampshire and don’t want to waste any of your precious vacation time trying to find the best spots to photograph?

Let me be your guide.

I now offer both personal and small group photo workshops and tours throughout New Hampshire.

From the rocky seacoast to the White Mountains, waterfalls to fall foliage, the Granite State is host to a wide variety of photographic opportunity.

My workshops are small, limited to 3 participants maximum, so I’m able to provide more personal attention to each individual. Plus, since most of my workshops are scheduled on an as requested basis, they are more often than not a private one-on-one experience tailored specifically to your photographic needs, wants, and physical abilities.

Here are a few of the scenic New Hampshire locations you could be photographing when you book a workshop with me.

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Whether it’s a spectacular sunrise on the rocky coast, or a winter sunset from the summit of one of New Hampshire’s tallest mountains, or anything in between, I will put together a custom photographic experience based on both your physical and photographic abilities.

The options are almost limitless.

Some examples of the workshop experiences I offer:

1 – The “Ride-along” 

On a ride-along though the focus will be on my own photos and scouting new locations, we’ll spend the day, usually in the White Mountains, taking pictures, scouting new locations, and discussing photography as we drive through some of New Hampshire’s most beautiful scenery. At only $125 the “Ride-along” is a very affordable investment in your photography where you’ll receive a good amount of the same personalized attention that you would on a half or full day workshop minus the ability to choose the locations visited.

2 – Half and Full day workshops custom made for you.

“Half-day” workshops ($250) usually run between 4-6 hours long, with a “Full day”($425) being from sunrise to sunset (with a break of an hour or so mid-day to rest up for the remainder to the day)

3 – Two Day Workshops and Tours. ($675)

On a two day workshop you’ll had better bring a lot of memory cards because we’ll be photographing a wide range of scenic locations and subjects throughout the state. Most of my two day workshops will be focused on a particular subject, such as waterfalls or autumn foliage, will often combine multiple types of landscape subjects. The vast majority of which are easily accessible from the road or via short and easy hike, making them perfect for people of all physical abilities.

4 – Multi-Day Backcountry Excursions. ($675 and up) 

If you’re an experienced hiker and backpacker looking to improve your photography, or you’re simply looking to capture landscapes that haven’t been photographed nearly as frequently as the more accessible locations, I offer 2, 3, or more days of photographing some of the most picturesque wilderness areas you’ll find in New Hampshire. Each day we’ll see and photograph majestic mountain vistas where we may be the only people for miles. Prior to all backcountry excursions a list of mandatory gear will be provided to each prospective participant with a full gear inspection made prior to hitting the trail. I reserve the right to refuse to lead someone I deem unprepared or who overstated their experience level. Safety is my primary concern while traveling in the wilderness. These trips are NOT for the inexperienced, or casual hiker.

And now the fine print.

To book a workshop contact me by clicking on the CONTACT page,

or call me at;  603-973-9886

A 50% deposit is required at least 60 days prior to your anticipated workshop to reserve your space on either a previously scheduled workshop or to book a private workshop, with the balance due within 30 days of the date. Cancelations made at least 30 days prior to the date of your workshop will receive a full refund. Cancelations made less than 30 days prior will be refunded less a $100 cancelation fee.

Meals, lodging, and transportation are not included in the workshop fee.

All workshops are rain or shine, within reason. In fact, in the case of a waterfall workshop you couldn’t ask for better weather than an overcast drizzley day. No refunds are given due to weather, though full or partial credit towards a future workshop will be given if the weather turns out to be truly terrible. Bad weather can result in great photos, but I’m not interested in venturing out if we’ll all be miserable.

Over the course of a multi day workshop, excluding backcountry, if time, location, and accommodations permitting, there may be some image review and post processing sessions during the mid-day.

Whether you’re an experienced photographer visiting the area and don’t want to spend your time searching out the best places to photograph, or a beginner who just bought their first camera, let me help you with your photography

Up Close And Personal

When photographing landscapes, especially with a wide angle lens, I often place my lens closeup to my foreground element. Doing so accentuates the prominence of your foreground in the composition by giving the illusion that it is larger than it really is.

Below are a few examples of how I used a wide angle lens to showcase the importance of the foreground within each scene.

Take a look at these other Closeups in this weeks photo challenge.

The Reward As Orange Fades To Blue.

Winter Light.

The view at 4,802′.

moosilauke_summit_winter_0724-Edit

There are 48 peaks on the official list of New Hampshire summits with an elevation of over 4,000 feet. Mount Moosilauke is #10 on that list. “The Moose,” is also the western most peak to be included on the list, and one I had yet to climb.

My reward for the effort, a snowshoe hike on a gorgeous brilliant winter afternoon under a clear blue sky, was to watch the sun as it set over windswept mountains and a moonlit hike back to the car.

As orange,

Winter Sunset, Mount Moosilauke

fades to blue.

Capturing Sunset, Photographer On Mt. Moosilauke

Thirds And Symmetry

The First Rule.

Know it.

Frozen Climb

One of the first “Rules” of photography that most people learn when first starting out is the Rule Of Thirds. 

When composing a photograph, visualize a grid across the scene, dividing it into thirds vertically and horizontally. Just like in a game of tic-tac-toe. For a more dynamic composition you should place your main subject at one of the intersections of these imaginary lines or along one of the lines themselves.

You should avoid placing your subject dead center in the frame. In the case of landscape photos you should also avoid placing the horizon through the center of the frame, placing it instead on or near one of the imaginary horizontal lines either 1/3 up from the bottom or 1/3 down from the top.

Pretty simple, right?

Then break it.

Cherry Pond Blue Hour Reflections

Photography rules were made to be broken.

In this case, due to the Symmetry of the reflection, placing the horizon line perfectly centered in the frame works quite well.

What other instances can you think of where you can break the Rule Of Thirds and still make a good photograph? What about using symmetry in your compositions?

Big, But How Big?

Just how grand is that landscape anyway?

Franconia Ridge From Mt. FlumeAre those mountains in the distance some of New Hampshire’s tallest, or just a few small hills? Without anything in the photo to provide a reference of scale it’s really hard to say for sure.

So what’s a photographer to do?

Simple, by incorporating something of a known size, like a person or a building into your photos you’re more easily able to give viewers a sense of scale in your image.

Fly Fishing At Sunset, Stonehouse Pond.

The fly fisherman standing in his canoe helps to give an idea of just how tall the granite cliffs along the shore of Stonehouse Pond are. (Can’t see him? Click on the image to see a larger version and look for the fisherman along the far shore towards the right side of the image).  

A lone hiker rests on his way to the summit of Mount Washington

Mt. Washington is the tallest peak in the northeast. Having my friend Glen, seen here taking a break on our way to the summit last July, gives an idea of just how big the mountain is. And how much farther we have to go before we reach the summit.

Washington And The Ravines Above Joe Dodge Lodge

Here’s another shot of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington, (the peak in the center of the frame), shown with the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Joe Dodge Lodge in the lower foreground. The lodge, the cars in the parking lot, as well as the roadway all provide scale to the mountains looming over them.

People and buildings aren’t the only thing to use to give a sense of scale. Anything of a commonly known size will work.

For more interpretations of this weeks Weekly Photo Challenge, click HERE.

Depth, Creating The Illusion.

The Problem With Landscape Photography.Lead The Way

We see the world around us in three dimensions, unfortunately our camera does not. Trying to convey the depth and dimension our eyes see with the two dimensional medium of photography can often leave the final image looking flat, without depth.

Fortunately, by using a few simple tricks when composing your photos you can effectively create the illusion of depth in your landscape images.

Converging Lines.

Falls In The Forest.

I like to use converging lines, both subtle and obvious, to create perceived depth in my compositions. In the photo above I used a rather winding interpretation of converging lines to help create the illusion of depth.

The waterfall and granite stream bank, very wide and taking up the entire foreground, then gets progressively more narrow while leading the eye deeper into the frame, eventually converging at the point where it disappears into the forest.

Railroad tracks as they appear to come together in the distance are another more obvious example of converging lines.

Rails. Pondicherry NWR

Place The Foreground In Shadow.

Odiorne Salt MarshThe human eye is attracted to bright light. By having a prominent foreground appear darker than the brighter, more brightly lit background can provide a sense of depth in your photos.

Shoot Vertical.

Moonrise Over Lonesome LakeI’ve found that by photographing with the camera in the vertical, more commonly referred to at the “portrait” camera position, can help create depth. Include a strong foreground, leading lines, and by placing the main subject in the upper third of the photo works really well to bring out the depth in a scene.

What tricks do you use to create the illusion of depth in your photos? In the mean time, check out these other interpretations of Depth.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Serenity

Mid-Stream. Mad River, Farmington, NH

Surround yourself in nature’s silence.

Close your eyes, release your thoughts.

Let serenity wash through.

Enjoy the Serenity