Mountains of Color Fall Foliage Workshop.

Join me for a Weekend of Color in the White Mountains of New Hampshire ~ October 6th – 9th.

 

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This years forecast calls for one of the best fall foliage seasons in a long time, and the White Mountains of New Hampshire are one of the most spectacular places to see and photograph the brilliant colors of Autumn.

Come along for 2 1/2 days during what is historically the peak of the fall color, where I’ll be taking a small number of clients to some of my favorite scenic destinations through the White Mountains Region as we photograph the beauty of autumn in New Hampshire.

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From iconic New England white steepled churches, to grand mountain vistas, I’ll share tips and techniques for capturing the brilliant beauty of autumn.

mountain views, Zealand Valley in Autumn

What to expect.

2 1/2 days of guiding and instruction on photographing the northern New Hampshire landscape during the most colorful time of year.

We’ll start our adventure Friday afternoon as we head out on a short and easy hike to one of the most scenic views in New Hampshire.

Then we’ll get up bright and early Saturday morning to greet the sunrise. Afterwards we’ll go over the mornings images as well as some post processing techniques using Adobe Lightroom and the Nik Collection by Google suit of plugins. (Get the Nik plugins for FREE HERE*

Then, after the mid-day break to rest, recharge, and get a bite to eat, we’ll head back out until sunset.

Beautiful autumn color and a mirror reflection on Wildlife Pond.

 

What to bring.

Camera, – any DSLR, mirrorless, or advanced point and shoot will do – as long as it can be controlled manually or in aperture priority mode. I strongly advise learning how to change the various settings, Shutter Speed, Aperture, ISO, etc., BEFORE you arrive for the workshop.

Wide angle zoom lens.

Tripod.

Lens filters – if you have them, especially a good quality circular polarizer is highly recommended.

Backpack – a small day pack or camera backpack is fine.

Shoes with good traction – there will be light to moderate hiking on uneven surfaces throughout the weekend.

Headlamp – nothing fancy, but we will be walking in the dark either before sunrise or after sunset.

If you have any further questions about what to bring feel free to use the Contact page to get in touch or leave a comment below.

Your Investment.

Your investment in this weekend of foliage photography is $725 for the full 2 1/2 days.

New For This Workshop, Lodging is included! That’s right, free lodging. I’ve rented a house for the weekend so all participants can be under one roof. This workshop coincides with the Columbus Day holiday weekend, and for any of you who have tried to book a room during this peak foliage viewing weekend the cost of the workshop alone is less than what you may expect to pay for two nights lodging in the North Conway area.

Space Is Limited, so don’t miss out! Contact me to reserve your spot today!

 

*Nik plugins have been an integral part of my post processing workflow, however Google has chosen to no longer support or offer updates to these fantastic image enhancement tools. As such while they still work with the latest version of Lightroom, they are only supported in Photoshop up to CC 2015. 

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STRUCTURE

Shadow Light Texture

Structure and Detail, Shadow and Light.

Bald Head Cliff, Cape Neddick, Maine.

Camera: Fujifilm X-T2

Lens: Fujinon XF16mm F/1.4

Settings: ISO 400, F/4, 1/750 sec.

Fuji RAF file converted to .DNG using Iridient X-Transformer, Velvia film simulation applied in Lightroom. No other post processing performed.

 

For this weeks WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

Mistakes Were Made.

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What do you do when you’re making a really long exposure that ends up being grossly overexposed?

You make it black and white of course.

Last night I was photographing on the Maine coast and experimenting with long exposures. The mistake I made was to trust the histogram displayed on the LCD of my Fujifilm X-T2 when dialing in the exposure time while using my 10-stop ND filter. With the shutter set for a 15 minute exposure the histogram indicated that the photo would be underexposed, however the final image showed just the opposite, with the sky grossly overexposed. As a last resort before deleting the shot I decided to convert it to monochrome.

Luckily it worked.

Next time I’m using ND filters and long exposures I’m going to stick with the Lee Filters exposure calculator app to set the exposure time. In the past this app has been pretty spot on.

 

Waterfalls at Mid-Day?

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Ideal Waterfall Light.

If you’d ask me to describe my ideal weather and lighting conditions for photographing waterfalls I would tell you that I hope for an overcast day and with any luck a slight drizzle. I would also tell you that it is definitely not during the middle of the day under harsh sunlight.

If I can’t have the even light of an overcast day, or at the very least the waterfall is in full shade, I wouldn’t even try to photograph flowing water.

And yet I was working under the harsh light of the mid-day sun when I made the above photograph of Jackson Falls in Jackson, NH.

Even Is Even.

Last weekend I was out with a workshop client and during a break we stopped to check out this beautiful road side waterfall. I was certainly not thinking it was going to be at all photographable since it was 2 in the afternoon. As we admired the flow I started to notice something about the light. It occurred to me that the waterfall was indeed illuminated by even light. It wasn’t the beautifully soft light of an overcast day, but it was even light nonetheless. So to satisfy my own curiosity I set up my Fujifilm X-T2 with XF16mm f/1.4 lens. Knowing I was going to need help getting a long enough exposure time to blur the water I attached my Formatt-Hitech Firecrest filter holder to the lens and inserted a 10-stop neutral density filter. As I was setting up my composition I set the aperture to f/16 and the ISO to 200. Much to my surprise with the 10-stop ND filter I found I was indeed able to get a long enough exposure, to the tune of 26 second! After I took my first shot I knew I was on to something.

Lesson learned.

I’d still prefer to photograph waterfalls when its overcast and rainy out, but at least now I don’t automatically put the camera away when it’s not.

 

Falling Water In Pinkham Notch.

 

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This past weekend I explored Thompson Falls for the first time. Had I known how beautiful this waterfall is I would have made a point of photographing here sooner. Located a short hike from the parking lot at the Wildcat ski area in Pinkham Notch, this is definitely one of the nicest waterfalls in the White Mountains.

More a series of falls rather than one single plunge, Thompson Falls seemed to go on and on. The higher I climbed the more there was to see. Give me a drizzly overcast day and I could easily spend 4-5 hours here photographing. Sadly, I had to cut this first visit short on account of darkness, but I have every intention of returning soon.

Horsetail, Thompson Falls, NH

These images are but a small sample of what this series of waterfalls has to offer. With the relative ease of the hike to get here I will certainly be adding this to the itinerary of upcoming waterfall workshops.

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For those interested in knowing, all of these images were captured using my Fujifilm X-T2 camera with the wonderful XF10-24mm lens. For all of the images I used Formatt-Hitech Firecrest filters, a circular polarizer as well as a 4-stop ND filter, all mounted in the Firecrest 100 filter holder.

 

 

WPC: Reflecting

Refelcting Sunrise

Sunrise Reflection. Hampton Beach, NH

Fujifilm X-T2, XF10-24, 10mm, f/11, ISO 200, 0.4 seconds.

Additionally I used a Haida 3-stop neutral density filter to slow the shutter speed a bit in combination with a Singh Ray 2-stop reverse graduated neutral density filter to help balance the sky with the darker foreground. To keep the filters in place I used a Formatt-Hitech Firecrest 100 filter holder.

Of course the camera was securely mounted on a tripod.

(Links are provided for your convenience, I have no affiliation with the companies mentioned)

Go HERE for more interpretations of Reflecting.

WPC: Surprise

A little over a week ago, on April 1st, we here in New Hampshire received one hell of an April Fools surprise. A spring snowstorm dumped over 18 inches of heavy wet snow on us.

Unable to resist an opportunity to capture a few landscape images with a blanket of fresh snow I grabbed my camera and ventured out.

For more Weekly Photo Challenge Surprises click HERE.