Isolating Elements

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Sumac Shadows On Old Barn. Ossipee, NH

Normally when out photographing I focus on expansive landscapes, grand scenic views of the dramatic views in the mountains and along the coast of New Hampshire.

On my last outing to the north country I chose to make images with a more limited view. Instead of wide open spaces, the majority of what I captured were elements within the wider scene. What caught my eye were the small details, the textures, the way light and shadow played across an abandoned barn or the rusted machinery.

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Cable Grooves Worn Into An Old Pulley. Redstone Granite Quarry, Conway, NH

 

Surprisingly, I didn’t set out with the mindset that “I’m only going to photograph details, closeups, and black and white images today.”

But that’s exactly what happened. In fact for the most part, wherever I went my eye was drawn to the little details, no matter how nice the overall scene looked it was the little things that caught my eye.

Part of the explanation is my recent feeling that I’ve been missing something, creatively speaking, in my photography. Focusing solely on landscape photography with an eye towards the grand, has been richly rewarding both creatively and financially, lately however that hasn’t been enough. The feeling that I’ve been missing something may have been what triggered my eye for the intimate on this particular day.

I know it is the driving force behind my current interest in portrait photography.(Stay tuned for an upcoming post on that bit of shocking divergence from my past, “I’ll never photograph people,” way of thinking).

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Barn Window. Ossipee, NH

The next time you’re out photographing, remember the most compelling photographs are often found while isolating the elements of the scene within the scene. You never know what, or who might be looking back at you.

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The Face Of Abandoned Places. Abandoned barn, Ossipee, NH

Starry Night.

Loon Island Light.

Starlight Lighthouse

This past Sunday morning, really, really early in the morning, long before the sun was even close to rising, I ventured out onto New Hampshire’s frozen and windy Lake Sunapee. I, along with two camera wielding friends, Garrett Evans, and Tony Baldasaro were out to photograph a lighthouse under the stars. Nothing adds that little extra something to your lighthouse photos like adding the Milky Way to the mix.

It was cold and windy, so windy Tony had to chase down my camera bag, with my Canon 17-40 and 70-200 lenses inside it, as it blew across the lake. Thanks, Tony! if I had been out there alone I’d still be looking for it.

Not long after the rescue of the runaway camera bag, the wind decided that it was time to blow over my tripod. With my camera on it, lucky me! The camera survived without a scratch, my Tokina 11-16 on the other hand is no longer the pristine lens it used to be. Fortunately it’s still alive and kicking, with but one small battle scar from its sudden encounter with the lake ice.

While my lens took a beating, and my stars aren’t quite the pin points I’d like them to be, all in all it was a very good night to be out on the ice and under the starry night sky.

Milky Way Over Loon Island Light

Weekly Photo Challenge: Shadowed

In the darkness, forgotten amidst decay.

Hidden beneath graffiti and peeling paint.

Shadows of the past lie long in the fading light.

The ravages of time exacts its price.

Nothing escapes.

Abandoned Garage.

If you wish, you may lurk in the shadows of others.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Yellow

Brick Pathways

Follow your own path.

Let the flowers be your guide.