Water Wet

H2O

For this week the Weekly Photo Challenge theme is good old H2O. As a landscape photographer water is the prevailing theme in many of my photographs. When looking through my photos trying to decide which photos to include in this post it appears that roughly three quarters of my photos contain water in one form or another.

Here are a few wet examples, followed by a few tips for making your own watery photos.

 

Tips for photographing the wet stuff.

1 ~ First and foremost, use a good quality circular polarizing filter, or CPL. If you only ever buy one filter make sure the CPL is it. It’s the one filter that cannot be duplicated digitally. They’re great for reducing or eliminating unwanted glare and reflections from wet rocks, leaves, and the surface of the water, thus allowing you to see through the surface of the water to what’s on the bottom.

2 ~ Don’t be afraid of a little rain. Most camera, whether they are listed as “weather sealed” or not are quite capable of withstanding a sprinkle or two. I always carry a small pack towel in my camera bag on the days I venture out when theres wain in the forecast.

Speaking of towels, dab don’t wipe the water off of your camera. Wiping could force the water into places that won’t make the camera happy.

3 ~ If it’s raining out use a lens hood to help keep raindrops from landing on the front element of your lens. Even when using a lens hood you should check the front element often and carry a clean microfiber lens cloth to wipe away any raindrops.

4 ~ When photographing water in its frozen form be sure to acclimate your camera slowly when you bring it inside after being out in the cold. The condensation that can form on, even worse in your camera again won’t make your camera very happy. I use two methods to deal with this. One is to put your camera in a large ziplock bag. Force as much air as possible out of the bag before sealing it. This way condensation will form on the outside of the bag, not your camera. The second is to simply put your camera in your camera bag and close it up, this is the method I use most. The padding on the camera bags act as insulation allowing the camera to slowly acclimate. Of course take your memory card out before hand so you do’t have to wait to upload your masterpieces.

Note: Tip #4 also applies to taking your camera from an air conditioned space out into hot humid weather.

Half Light

The blue hour over the rocky seacoast along Prouts Neck in Scarborough, Maine

 

Peaceful moments between dusk and dawn,

Life still asleep starts to awaken,

When the world is colored blue.

Photography 101: Edge

The Edge Of The Sea,

The Edge Of Daylight.

Portland Head Light, Blue Hour in Black and White.

Scenic Portland Head Light captured in Black and White

Photography 101: Landscape

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.”
John Muir

Photography 101: Architecture

Architecture

Historic

The Cocheco Mill Building in downtown Dover, NH. The bright blue-white spotlight on the tower shining brightly, a mirror image of the building reflected in the glass smooth water above the waterfalls. Numerous widows are lit from within in this long brick structure.

Scenic

Winter Nubble, Pastel Sky

Forgotten

Abandoned Farmhouse, Winter

Happy Hour Begins At Three

 

And Michelle, the Queen of Peace will be there.

 

Michelle.

Looking Back – My Favorite Images from 2013

2013 Through The Lens.

The past year has been outstanding for me. Physically, I don’t think I’ve ever been in better shape, even better than when I was racing mountain bikes. I can thank my time hiking in the mountains for that. And running, lots and lots of running.

Photographically, I’m happier with the images I’ve captured than ever before. I find myself shooting less, yet coming back with more. I’m developing a more critical eye towards what I photograph, knowing exactly what I want to capture and how I want to capture it. Fewer images from any given outing means less time in front of the computer too. A trend I hope to continue in the coming year.

Now the hard part.

Trying to come up with 12 favorite images from the past year though, that was tough. Not so much coming up with favorites, but narrowing it down to only 12, that was a challenge. Making the task even harder for me, when I set out to compile this list I had one self-imposed rule –  only one image from each of the last 12 months.

 So here they are, my favorite 12 images from the past year.

What’s Missing?

I purposely didn’t call this a “Best Of” list because that’s all very subjective and I’ll leave it up to you to decide what you feel is my best image from 2013.

So what’s missing? Is there a particular image I’ve shared over the past year that you think should have made the list?

I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Finally, to all my fans, subscribers, and those just passing through, I’d like to wish you all the best in the coming year.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!