You People Piss Me Off!

That’s right, you.

You know who you are. You’re the person who either can’t read, or understand pictures, or you simply think the rules don’t apply to you.
Sensitive ecosystem, that’s for suckers.

Inconsiderate People Visit The Dunes

You’re the fisherman who has plenty of energy to carry your bait container down to the stream.
Probably a six pack too.
Inconsiderate People On The Stream
Yet the exertion required to carry it was too much for you to bear. Leaving you so drained you were unable to carry the empty container out with you. I know, I know, lifting the colossal weight of the empty container, then carrying it the thirty yards back to your car so you could dispose of it properly was obviously far too daunting a task for you to undertake.
Yea, you know who you are.
And you Suck!
- End of rant.

Photography 101: The Natural World

Beauty and Wonder Abound

Nature is meant to be lived.

Nature and the Natural World is best enjoyed not through a window or a photograph, but first hand and up close.

In order to witness the magic,

Nature needs to be experienced.

The Photographers Curse.

The Insidious Photographer’s Ailment.

Curves And Raindrops

When you look at a photograph what do you first see?

Do you see a well composed photograph that perfectly captures the beauty of the scene, or do you see the slightly blown highlights in the water in an otherwise good image of a waterfall?

Do you see a dramatic sunset with an amazing sky, or do you notice a horizon that is almost imperceptibly crooked?

Do you see an excellent image of a city skyline at night, or do you see the digital noise, however slight it may be?

Do you notice the brilliant green and wonderfully patterned leaves covered in raindrops, or are your eyes drawn to the several specs of dirt that should have been clone out?

If you answered yes to any of these questions you are afflicted with what I refer to as The Photographers Curse. 

I too am cursed.

Sadly I’ve found the better I become at the craft of photography, the more severe the symptoms of this insidious disease, the more even the slightest perceived flaw in an otherwise perfect photograph jumps out at me.

Edited to add – I don’t necessarily find these “flaws” detrimental to the overall photograph, a good photo is a good photo after all. It’s that I can’t not see them if they are there in the first place that is the curse.

 

 

Are you afflicted, and are you able to “turn off” the inner photographer and simply enjoy?